Saturday, December 20, 2014

Manitoba


Auto insurance in Manitoba is provided by a government-run insurance
company, Manitoba Public Insurance (MPI). Since 1971, Manitoba consumers
have had very little choice in how and where they buy their car
insurance. If they are dissatisfied with the service provided by MPI or
the premiums they are being charged, drivers in Manitoba do not have the
same options as do drivers in other provinces – the option to switch
insurance companies.
A competitive business environment is a powerful incentive for insurers
to deliver the best service and to understand and meet consumers’ needs.
Auto insurance is no exception to this rule. As consumers’ needs
change, private insurance companies respond by offering innovative new
products and services. Product innovations such as first accident
forgiveness, replacement cost coverage, roadside assistance, and payment
plans were all adopted in competitive jurisdictions long before they
were available in provinces with government-run auto insurance systems.
All provinces in Canada have some form of no-fault accident benefits
that are paid to all accident victims. The difference across the
provinces is the degree to which tort (the right to sue) or no-fault
(access to accident benefits) is emphasized. Manitoba auto insurance
operates in a “pure” no-fault environment. This means that if you are
injured in a car collision, you are entitled to a standard and per-established set of benefits provided by the government-run insurer.
If your needs should change or you require additional financial support,
you cannot – under any circumstances – sue for more.

Minimum Required Auto Insurance

Coverage in Manitoba

As of May 1, 2013


Compulsory minimum third-party liability:$200,000
is available for any one accident; however, if a claim involving both
bodily injury and property damage reaches this figure, payment for
property damage will be capped at $20,000
Medical payments:No time or amount limit
Funeral expense benefits:7,877 (maximum)
Disability income benefits:90% of net wages based on gross annual income of maximum $87,000 year; nothing is payable for the first 7 days of disability
Death benefits:Death
any time after injury; benefits for partners depend on wage and age of
deceased and range from $57,798 to $435,000; benefits for dependent
children depend on their age and range from $27,021 to $49,777; disabled
dependants receive an additional $25,286; non-dependent children or
parents receive $12,871
Impairment benefits:Minimum $721/week, maximum $144,490 for non-catastrophic injury. Maximum $228,154 for catastrophic injury
Right to sue for pain and suffering?No
Right to sue for economic loss in excess of no-fault benefits?No
Administration:Government (government and private insurers compete for optional and excess coverage)
Notes:Residents
of Manitoba involved in accidents in Quebec can receive from their own
insurer the equivalent to the benefits available to Quebec residents
from the Société de l'assurance automobile du Québec.First-party
all perils* insurance is compulsory in Manitoba (deductibles vary
according to type of vehicle). Policyholders may purchase coverage for
economic loss greater than maximum accident benefits. Lawsuits are not
permitted with respect to injuries sustained in automobile accidents in
Manitoba. Victims and their dependants who reside in Manitoba are
compensated by the government insurer for their injuries whether or not
the accident occurs in Manitoba.

Steps Required to Become a Fully Licensed Driver in Manitoba

Introduced January 1, 2003

How do I become a Learner?

To enter the Learner Stage (Class 5), you must:

  • Be at least 16 (15½ if you are in a high school driver education program)
  • Take a vision test
  • Take a driving knowledge test
  • Have a parent or guardian’s consent (if you are under 18)

How long will I be in the Learner Stage?

You must be in the Learner Stage for at least nine months. You can stay
in the Learner Stage for as long as you want as long as you don’t let
your Learner’s licence lapse. You can leave the Learner Stage no earlier
than age 16 years and three months.

What are the restrictions while I am in the Learner Stage?

You must drive with a supervisory driver who has a valid Class 5
driver’s licence. The supervisory driver must be in the front
passenger’s seat. Passengers in the back seat must wear seatbelts. You
cannot drink when you are driving – your blood alcohol must be zero.

What else should I know?

You must be careful not to break any rules of the road. If you have any
infractions, you may get a warning letter, an additional driving course,
or even a driver hearing.

How do I enter the Intermediate Stage?

To enter the Intermediate Stage, you must complete the nine-month
Learner Stage and then pass the Class 5 road test. If you demonstrate
dangerous driving during the road test, you may have to obtain
permission from the Registrar before taking it again. If you are in the
graduated licensing program and fail the road test, there is a 14-day
waiting period to take it again.

How long will I be in the Intermediate Stage?

You will be in the Intermediate Stage for a minimum of 15 months.

What are the restrictions while I am in the Intermediate Stage?

Between midnight and 5 a.m., you can have only one passenger, unless you
have a supervisory driver in the front passenger’s seat. If you have a
supervisory driver in the front seat, you can have passengers in the
back seat, but they must wear seat-belts. In addition, no matter what the
time of day, you cannot drink when you are driving – your blood alcohol
must be zero.

What else should I know?

You must be careful not to break any rules of the road. If you have any
infractions, you may be given a warning letter, an additional driving
course, or even a driver hearing. After 15 months with no infractions,
you will automatically become a Full Stage driver.

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